Tag Archives: Houston

Statements from Jere

If I hear one more person, legal or otherwise, that Jody Turner and I have lived here, rent free, for 5 plus years, I’lll go off! When the default judgment was entered, because Queens Park did not respond until October of 2014 after the default was entered in April of 2014, the default was already final, according to court rules and such. Under that, we were told by other attorneys that looked at the case, there is no place to pay the mortgage any longer and the house was ours through process of elimination. Debt was canceled with the default judgment.

The default judgment nuffified the mortgage, promissory note and deed of trust. Why Judge Hinde vacated it in 2017 and we did not hear about it until May 30th of 2018, is a mystery to me. Our attorneys do not return phone calls and haven’t spoken to us since the case for statutory mortgage fraud was filed in 2012. That was the last time we heard from our attorneys until May 30th of 2018. This is wrong on so many levels. Case number 201366296 in Harris County District Court 269. Attorneys for us are John C. Osborne and William Robertson.

Our mortgage originated here in Houston through Marquis Money, Jeremy Raddack, who was an unlicensed mortgage broker at the time. Flagstar Bank was our initial mortgage servicer and very difficult to deal with.
1. I know Flagstar did not conduct its operations in the underwriting of FHA loans in accordance with HUD-FHA regulations.
I have learned that on February 24, 2012, Flagstar admitted, acknowledged, and accepted responsibility for submitting false certifications to HUD about the eligibility of its loans for FHA insurance.
I also learned that a settlement was reached with the U.S Attorney’s Office, the lender agreed to pay $132.8 million to the United States in damages and penalties under the False Claims Act and to reform its business practices.
Flagstar admitted that during the period January 1, 2002, to February 24, 2012, it delegated underwriting decisions to unauthorized staff.

58105516 Original Petition-page-003
2. I learned that the lender also admitted that it underwrote and approved for FHA insurance loans that did not comply with certain HUD-FHA underwriting requirements, and HUD paid insurance claims on these ineligible loans.
Further, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced that Flagstar set daily quotas for its HUD approved underwriters and underwriting assistants and paid these employees substantial incentive awards for exceeding daily quotas.
Flagstar agreed to pay $132.8 million and to other concessions to resolve the U.S. Government’s claims.
The lender agreed to pay $15 million within 30 days after approval of the settlement by the court and make additional payments totaling $117.8 million as soon as it met certain financial benchmarks.

58105516 Original Petition-page-004
3. Additionally, Flagstar agreed to
(1) comply with all relevant HUD-FHA rules applicable to direct endorsement lenders,
(2) the completion of a 1-year period in which Flagstar’s compliance with HUD-FHA rules would be monitored by a third party at Flagstar’s
expense, and
(3) implementation of a training program for all employees involved in the origination and underwriting of FHA loans. Flagstar also agreed to certify to HUD that the individuals in senior leadership positions who previously had primary responsibility for initiating and overseeing Flagstar’s manual underwriting process were no longer employed by the lender.

58105516 Original Petition-page-005
4. I also found out, through research, that on February 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, Case No. 12-cv-01392, against the Company alleging that for over a decade Flagstar had been improperly approving thousands of residential home mortgage loans for government insurance. Specifically, the DOJ alleges that the Company: used unauthorized staff employees in the loan approval process; paid substantial incentive awards to these unauthorized employees for exceeding certain quotas; permitted underwriters to submit false certifications to the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”); and misled FHA and HUD by certifying that the loans had been fully underwritten by properly registered and sufficiently experienced underwriters when they had not. The DOJ further alleges that as a result of the foregoing, thousands of loans were approved for government insurance that did not qualify for insurance and when the loans defaulted, HUD was forced to cover the losses.

58105516 Original Petition-page-007
5. I have also found out that On March 13, 2012 it was announced that shareholder rights firm Robbins Umeda LLP was investigating possible breaches of fiduciary duty and other violations of the law by certain officers and directors at Flagstar Bancorp, Inc.
In particular the firm investigated allegations that Flagstar violated the False Claims Act when it improperly endorsed federally insured mortgage loans that eventually defaulted and falsely certified its loan underwriting practices to federal housing authorities. On February 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a complaint against Flagstar, which alleges that Flagstar utilized under-qualified underwriting assistants to approve thousands of residential home mortgage loans for Federal Housing Administration insurance. The complaint also alleges that Flagstar improperly set daily quotas for the underwriting assistants and paid them substantial incentive awards for exceeding their quotas. While engaging in this scheme, the officers and directors of the company not only exposed Flagstar to significant liability, but represented to the investing public that Flagstar was operating in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.
6. In September, 2010 we began sending numerous documents to them every month and received false statements from them in return. This mortgage is in three names and I am a Disabled Marine Corps Veteran with Veterans Benefits from the Vietnam Era and other resources. I have a caregiver, the other person that is on the loan with me and is recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs in such a capacity. I have been ignored by Flagstar as on the mortgage and various programs that are here in the United States and in Texas are not even able to be discussed about down payment assistance, loan modification or other asset protections for the Veteran or the Disabled. This household hit some hard times due to layoffs and job loss but we are working on that and I am attempting to go back to work under the Ticket to Work Program of the Department of Social Security as I do not wish to stay on disability my entire life but prefer to be productive.
I also filed an Equal Housing Opportunity Complaint through HUD in September of 2010 simply because Flagstar tried to delve into the nature of my disability.
7. We did receive paperwork from Flagstar Bank on May 4th, 2011 with a reinstatement agreement that is very vague and is not complete and has a clause in it that we cannot seek legal action at any time over this. It was to be signed and returned by May 12/13, however, the trustee in this foreclosure and the bank filed the Sheriff Sale on May 10, 2011 before this paper work and first payment was to be remitted .
8. I received a mortgage adjustment from Flagstar Bank on August 1, 2011 through the Department of Housing and Development after filing a complaint concerning ongoing struggle to achieve a mortgage modification. We began this process in September, 2010 under constant threat of Foreclosure.

9. There are three lawsuits this has been through, cause 201139174, Dismissed for lack of prosecution, cause 201366296, Default Judgment in April of 2014 and vacated in March of 2017, cause 201659914 dismissed under No Suit by plaintiff Queens Park Oval Asset Holding Trust.

10. We were not contacted after the second meeting for the second lawsuit with William Robertson in October, 2013 until May 30, 2018 concerning the ongoing issues. This is now up for trial and we hired Brain Tagtmeier for this lawsuit and for knowledge concerning the case number 201366296 and to handle case number 201659914 in 2015.
11. The call from John C. Osborne, whom I found out was under suspension during the time frame of these three case and William J. Robertson along with text messages told us we owe twenty thousand dollars. The call came on May 30, 2018. We had dismissed them in 2015 for lack of communication. Brian Tagtmeier is our new attorney and defended 201659914.

hinde
12. Mr. Robertson refused to put damages into the case, thus leaving an open door for continuous litigation and is an egregious mistake.
Today, we are losing our home and heading into bankruptcy. I am a disable USMC Veteran and am very concerned about this. My spouse is Jody Turner and we are scrambling to get a new place to live. We have three rescue animals also.
Thank you for your consideration.

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Mortgage Scam

 

Consumers need to know that they may be dealing with companies who are unlicensed and are not authorized to act as a mortgage lender or mortgage broker. In addition, it is also an unfair and deceptive act for a licensed mortgage lender or mortgage broker to conduct business with a person or company which is not licensed.

Here was the trap we fell into. Marquis Money, an unlicensed company in Houston, was our mortgage broker. He worked with Flagstar Bank with underwater and subprime mortgages.

Predatory Lending and Mortgage Fraud

On February 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, Case No. 12-cv-01392, against the Company alleging that for over a decade Flagstar had been improperly approving thousands of residential home mortgage loans for government insurance. Specifically, the DOJ alleges that the Company: used unauthorized staff employees in the loan approval process; paid substantial incentive awards to these unauthorized employees for exceeding certain quotas; permitted underwriters to submit false certifications to the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”); and misled FHA and HUD by certifying that the loans had been fully underwritten by properly registered and sufficiently experienced underwriters when they had not. The DOJ further alleges that as a result of the foregoing, thousands of loans were approved for government insurance that did not qualify for insurance and when the loans defaulted, HUD was forced to cover the losses.

On March 13,2012 it was announced that shareholder rights firm Robbins Umeda LLP was investigating possible breaches of fiduciary duty and other violations of the law by certain officers and directors at Flagstar Bancorp, Inc.

In particular, the firm investigated allegations that Flagstar violated the False Claims Act when it improperly endorsed federally insured mortgage loans that eventually defaulted and falsely certified its loan underwriting practices to federal housing authorities. On February 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a complaint against Flagstar, which alleges that Flagstar utilized under-qualified underwriting assistants to approve thousands of residential home mortgage loans for Federal Housing Administration insurance. The complaint also alleges that Flagstar improperly set daily quotas for the underwriting assistants and paid them substantial incentive awards for exceeding their quotas. While engaging in this scheme, the officers and directors of the company not only exposed Flagstar to significant liability, but, represented to the investing public that Flagstar was operating in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.

Flagstar did not conduct its operations in the underwriting of

FHA loans in accordance with HUD-FHA regulations.

On February 24, 2012, Flagstar admitted, acknowledged, and accepted responsibility for submitting false certifications to HUD about the eligibility of its loans for FHA insurance.

In a settlement reached with the U.S Attorney’s Office, the lender

agreed to pay $132.8 million to the United States in damages and penalties under the False Claims Act and to reform its business practices.

Flagstar admitted that during the period January 1, 2002, to February 24, 2012, it delegated underwriting decisions to unauthorized staff.

The lender also admitted that it underwrote and approved for FHA insurance loans that did not comply with certain HUD-FHA underwriting requirements, and HUD paid insurance claims on these ineligible loans.

Further, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced that Flagstar set daily quotas for its HUD approved underwriters and underwriting assistants and paid these employees substantial incentive awards for exceeding daily quotas.

Flagstar agreed to pay $132.8 million and to other concessions to resolve the U.S. Government’s claims.

The lender agreed to pay $15 million within 30 days after approval of the settlement by the court and make additional payments totaling $117.8 million as soon as it met certain financial benchmarks.

Additionally, Flagstar agreed to

(1) comply with all relevant HUD-FHA rules applicable to direct endorsement lenders,

(2) the completion of a 1-year period in which Flagstar’s compliance with HUD-FHA rules would be monitored by a third party at Flagstar’s expense, and

(3) implementation of a training program for all employees involved in the origination and underwriting of FHA loans. Flagstar also agreed to certify to HUD that the individuals in senior leadership positions who previously had primary responsibility for initiating and overseeing Flagstar’s manual underwriting process were no longer employed by the lender

We bought our home in 2008, started negotiations with Flagstar for a HAMP mortgage adjustment. After a year of back and forth paper work, we decided to hire an attorney to straighten this out. We were told not to make anymore payments until it was straightened out.

Bad advice from  a bad attorney.

Don’t let this happen to you!

My PSA for the day.

hinde

 

Jeremy Radak Mortgage Scam Artist

Predatory Lending and Planned Foreclosure in USA

Consumers need to know that they may be dealing with companies who are unlicensed and are not authorized to act as a mortgage lender or mortgage broker. In addition, it is also an unfair and deceptive act for a licensed mortgage lender or mortgage broker to conduct business with a person or company which is not licensed.
Here was the trap we fell into. Marquis Money, an unlicensed company in Houston, was our mortgage broker. He worked with Flagstar Bank with underwater and subprime mortgages.

Predatory Lending and Mortgage Fraud

On February 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, Case No. 12-cv-01392, against the Company alleging that for over a decade Flagstar had been improperly approving thousands of residential home mortgage loans for government insurance. Specifically, the DOJ alleges that the Company: used unauthorized staff employees in the loan approval process; paid substantial incentive awards to these unauthorized employees for exceeding certain quotas; permitted underwriters to submit false certifications to the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”); and misled FHA and HUD by certifying that the loans had been fully underwritten by properly registered and sufficiently experienced underwriters when they had not. The DOJ further alleges that as a result of the foregoing, thousands of loans were approved for government insurance that did not qualify for insurance and when the loans defaulted, HUD was forced to cover the losses.
On March 13,2012 it was announced that shareholder rights firm Robbins Umeda LLP was investigating possible breaches of fiduciary duty and other violations of the law by certain officers and directors at Flagstar Bancorp, Inc.
In particular, the firm investigated allegations that Flagstar violated the False Claims Act when it improperly endorsed federally insured mortgage loans that eventually defaulted and falsely certified its loan underwriting practices to federal housing authorities. On February 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a complaint against Flagstar, which alleges that Flagstar utilized under-qualified underwriting assistants to approve thousands of residential home mortgage loans for Federal Housing Administration insurance. The complaint also alleges that Flagstar improperly set daily quotas for the underwriting assistants and paid them substantial incentive awards for exceeding their quotas. While engaging in this scheme, the officers and directors of the company not only exposed Flagstar to significant liability, but, represented to the investing public that Flagstar was operating in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.
Flagstar did not conduct its operations in the underwriting of
FHA loans in accordance with HUD-FHA regulations.

On February 24, 2012, Flagstar admitted, acknowledged, and accepted responsibility for submitting false certifications to HUD about the eligibility of its loans for FHA insurance.
In a settlement reached with the U.S Attorney’s Office, the lender agreed to pay $132.8 million to the United States in damages and penalties under the False Claims Act and to reform its business practices.
Flagstar admitted that during the period January 1, 2002, to February 24, 2012, it delegated underwriting decisions to unauthorized staff.
The lender also admitted that it underwrote and approved for FHA insurance loans that did not comply with certain HUD-FHA underwriting requirements, and HUD paid insurance claims on these ineligible loans.
Further, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced that Flagstar set daily quotas for its HUD approved underwriters and underwriting assistants and paid these employees substantial incentive awards for exceeding daily quotas.
Flagstar agreed to pay $132.8 million and to other concessions to resolve the U.S. Government’s claims.
The lender agreed to pay $15 million within 30 days after approval of the settlement by the court and make additional payments totaling $117.8 million as soon as it met certain financial benchmarks.
Additionally, Flagstar agreed to
(1) comply with all relevant HUD-FHA rules applicable to direct endorsement lenders,
(2) the completion of a 1-year period in which Flagstar’s compliance with HUD-FHA rules would be monitored by a third party at Flagstar’s expense, and
(3) implementation of a training program for all employees involved in the origination and underwriting of FHA loans. Flagstar also agreed to certify to HUD that the individuals in senior leadership positions who previously had primary responsibility for initiating and overseeing Flagstar’s manual underwriting process were no longer employed by the lender

hinde

We bought our home in 2008, started negotiations with Flagstar for a HAMP mortgage adjustment in 2009. After a year of back and forth paper work, we decided to hire an attorney to straighten this out in 2010. We were told not to make anymore payments until it was straightened out.
Bad advice from a bad attorney.
Don’t let this happen to you!
My PSA for the day.

#flagstarbank #Houston #Mortgage #Foreclosure #HUD

Judge Dan Hinde

This is a letter my husband wrote to Judge Dan Hinde, District Court 269, Harris County Texas.  His ruling on our 8 year long case is abhorrent and he is up for reelection.  From the beginning of the trial, when he referred to my Husband as “Mrs. Turner”, I knew the fix was in.  Elaine Stoute was the attorney for the defendent, Queens Park Oval Assets Holding Trust.

The case is Statutory Mortgage Fraud and our attorneys, that we fired in 2015, continued to speak for us, without our knowledge. John C Osborne and William Robertson from Houston, Texas are scam artists to the ninth degree and not to be trusted.

hinde

John C. Osborne record:

PUBLIC DISCIPLINARY HISTORY
State of Texas*
Sanction Entry date
(Start-End)
Sanction
(Start-End)
Probation
Fully Probated Suspension

12/15/09 01/01/10 – 12/31/13
Partially Probated Suspension

09/09/13 01/01/14 – 12/31/14 01/01/15 – 12/31/16

The Letter:

Your Honor:
My name is Jody Turner and you tried a case on July 2 of 2018. I wanted to say thank you for your ruling, But I feel there was something you may have over looked for the case went on for 8 years. It was not about us paying the mortgage for when we first filled it was due to Statutory Fraud for Marque Money, Jeremy Radack, Son of County Commissioner Steve Radack and Texas Supreme Court Justice Radack, was not registered in the state of Texas as a broker. To me that would void everything.
The reason we did not sue Marquis Money for his he son of Steve Radack and he the constable and his mother sits on the supreme court of Texas. Do you think it would be worth it.? We did not so we did not file on them. But what I disappointed in was the way the big company and get way with things and the other guys get the boot to say.
To me, if someone is not registered in the state of Texas, that says they cannot not do business in the State and anything that all he signs would have been voided.
So instead the big company come in can confuse the courts and the case around and the little people get the boot. For us, we have housed many people in the time of need, to get them off the streets of Houston and with the ruling you make you put more out on the streets. Ever wonder why there are so many people on the streets? Well I don’t know many people that are hardworking that make about 13.00 dollars or less that make 3Xs the rent for a one bed room going for 850.00 X 3 would 2555.00 a month then add all their other expense to that and people and not afford it. Not everyone was lucky enough to get elected to the bench.
Like I said we tried to pay the mortgage, but they did not want so we were putting some of money back into the house and paying the other bill we could. The house foundation is cracked, black mold, the doors won’t shut, the pipes are breaking and all there is more, but I don’t want to bore you.
Most people thought we were living high on the hog. but we were not. The house we bought, was for 5 people. One person backed out before we bought the house. As time went on we bought there was 4 us then 2 year in one died the other move out. We were trying find others to live with us, so we can keep the house.
All this was over a high-power man that want to be working in Texas they did not have the right to do so. So, I guess it is ok to do things in Texas without a license or being registered in Texas and if you have money and power you can do what you want. For if we could have found some good lawyer as well we may have won the case. So, the company wins as the little lose again.
I just wish you would have look over the whole case.

Mr. Jody Turner

Dr. Jere K Douglas, ESQ

There is a lot more, but I would not recommend doing business in the State of Texas.

Rampant Foreclosures Under Shady Companies

RoundPoint Mortgage services hundreds of DASP mortgages in Philadelphia through shell companies with names like Newlands Asset Holding Trust or Queens Park Oval Asset Trust, all based out of the same anonymous North Carolina office building. Newlands, a company with no listed phone number, no website and a single publicly disclosed employee has accumulated 46 properties in Philadelphia through foreclosure proceedings.

It has flipped about 10 of those properties. In one instance, Newlands foreclosed on 3687 Belgrade Street, a newly built townhouse in a middle-class neighborhood of Philadelphia, for just $65,000 in February 2014, two months after it had picked up the mortgage at a DASP sale. Another two months later, having made no major improvements to the property, Newlands resold the same house for $175,000.

These are in the minority of properties, however. In the majority of cases, private equity firms appear to mainly sit on the properties they accumulate, sometimes for years. If DASP buyers are renting out their new assets while they wait for home values to appreciate, many do not appear to be doing so legally: Out of dozens of properties owned by Newlands analyzed by City & State, none had received a rental license.

City & State reached out to both HUD and RoundPoint for comment on multiple occasions, but received no reply from
either entity.

Philadelphia councilmember Gym said she believed this process is increasing the number of vacant and rental properties in urban neighborhoods, in addition to other stressors.

“When you have homeowners who are evicted or who lose their homes, that has dramatic consequences for a city like ours that already struggles with poverty,” she said. “We have affordable housing waitlists that take years and homeless shelters that are overcrowded. We can’t fix it all.”

It doesn’t have to be this way. Gym is part of Local Progress, a network of local elected officials that has pushed for reforms to programs like DASP. In June, HUD announced that it would make an effort to steer more distressed mortgages to nonprofit buyers, who would ideally be more forgiving towards impoverished homeowners. Nonprofit mortgage buyers, known as community development financial institutions, or CDFIs, were previously outbid on 98 percent of DASP sales.

HUD now separates out some mortgages for sale specifically to nonprofits. But Gym would like to see the program go further.

“That’s one of our biggest questions. Does it all have to go to private equity or could some go to CDFIs? Or the land bank?” she said, in a recent interview.

Gym had been a champion of the land bank, an arm of City Hall that acquires blighted property. She said she believes the agency could also function as a receiver for distressed mortgages, cribbing off a model implemented in New York City, where the municipality began bidding on DASP sales.

“It’s driven by our need to not increase our homelessness and eviction rates, and not lead to blight. Because we were seeing so much,” she said. “The consequences both to individuals and communities are dramatic – the Fed not being attentive to problems like this exacerbates our local situations.”

Changing the trajectory of DASP for future homeowners can seem like a daunting and risky proposition for cities like Philadelphia, but it could stave off years of misery and legal battles for homeowners who find themselves in situations similar to Beverly Henry’s.

Henry admits even she is overwhelmed by the intricacies of her own mortgage crisis at times, but says she is driven by a simple and understandable urge.

“We just don’t want to lose our home.” 

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Greetings From The Burbs of West Houston

Howdy!

Happy Cinco D Mayo from the Burbs of Houston.

Today is a wonderful day for me and cause for celebration. My eyes opened yesterday and after three decades of believing my time on this earth was to be short, I realized that perhaps all the doctors have been wrong.

This epiphany came out in a counseling session at Montrose Center yesterday as I bared it all. I have had three doctors tell me, at different times, that I had three for five years to live, get my affairs in order. I began to die in the eighties and forgot how to live.

The disease is HIV and I am a long term survivor,. I’m not alone in this and it’s an interesting road to travel. I am not ashamed nor am I afraid as I was in the eighties. I am not dirty, in fact I am quite healthy.

I made personal and financial decisions in the eighties, based on the limited knowledge of the medical community at the time, on what to do with present and future assets. As I look back and see where the residuals and royalties went, I can say that I have no regrets but it’s my turn now.

My last no hope diagnosis was when I had the heart attack and stroke in 2008 after my mother passed away. Guess what, I recovered from that also.
Now, I am accepting that I probably have a long life to live and it’s to live that life instead of feeling like I am facing the grim reaper every day.

It’s great to feel alive again and see the sun come up with all the beautiful colors and feeling the blessings of love, friendship and nature that engulf me right now.

Blessings to each of you today and to my partner in this journey called life,Jody Turner.

 

Today’s Listening in the Burbs

In my life I have been around some amazing people and heard their stories.  This man, Olivier Messiaen and a personal friend of his, Jean Langlais befriended me on a performance trip to Europe in the eighties I made. The “Quartet for the End of Time” was a piece I had heard and thought it to be way outside my boundaries both on technical and artistic aspects.  However, when I heard his and Jean’s story, they inspired me to move beyond my self-imposed boxes and explore different realities in interpretation and performance.

 

I was not aware of the life history of Olivier but I found out as he shared with me about the conditions around the composing of the Quartet and that sharing was so powerful to me that I made a decision to tackle that work.  At the same time, there was another influence in my life, a young artist named Marshall Fine, who saw the potential in me and pushed me to look outside my personal boundaries and become the artist that was trapped inside me.

There is another work that is performed a lot by Charles-Marie Widor, one of the mentors of Olivier, the Widor Toccatta.  It’s a powerful, fantastic work and every time I hear it here in Houston, I go to a different place mentally and remember.

Another composer I work with is John Rutter and I just played the clarinet for this work in Houston.

While I am in the kitchen cooking ,it’s on auto play through the house sound system!

Laters!

 

 

Greetings from the Burbs!

Today, it is raining again here in West Houston and we are still watching those damn dams.  What does a suburban House Husband do without a Suburban?  We cook, chat and clean closets!  LOL  That gay agenda is really something.

I do have a special girl in my life, her name is Miss Lady.

A Broth for a Lady

Miss Lady is our Great Pyrenees that we inherited upon the passing of a friend.  She, like our other family members, are all rescues and we love them dearly.  She is getting up in years and has something that is endemic to this breed of dog, hip dysplasia.  I did my research and avoided costly vet bills by changing her diet.  By the way, she is about 16 plus years old and still trucking along like a teenager.

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Her diet now consists of broths that I have adapted from the Far East that provide the joint lubrication to interact with the chondroitin (Available through Amazon) supplements we give her.  To make this broth, I go to the meat markets for bones, knuckle bones, chicken thighs, beef hooves and such that would make the broth for various noodle soup dishes in Japan and China. Yes Dears!  Those excellent broths have very humble beginnings!

Nabeyaki Udon Nippon

Here is my recipe

3 to 5 pounds of bones with meat

1 gallon of water to begin

Celery tops, Carrot tops with carrots (any type of extra from regular cooking)

Set to boil then simmer on the stove, adding water as needed for about 24 hours.

What I end up with I split between her bowl and freeze the rest in Ice Trays as it is a great addition to any dish that requires bullion in it.

We love our kids and hope to keep them healthy and happy!

What else does a Houston House Husband do on a rainy day?  We write blogs!
Have a good day!

Jere!

Hourly Rates Verses Set Price

Why hourly rates don’t pay…at least not what you’re worth anyway! Reply to each point based on your experiences. I’ll post each new point in its own post. #1 Because you’re chronic overachievers and over-deliverers, you’re almost guaranteeing you’ll be underpaid for your work because you’ll work well beyond the agreed upon time to get it right. Am I right or am I right?!
#1 is spot on with me! I am a dyed in the wool perfectionist and the hours I put in preparing for that twenty minutes of fame on the stage amount to about 4 to 6 months of my valuable time. There is also the communication with the Maestro, first chairs in the orchestras and such where I put out my interpretation of the piece I am performing. All that for 175 dollars became a drudge to me and led to economic and personal frustrations. I began to feel that what I do was not valued.
To make a difference, I did a time management study based on my professional rate elsewhere and came up with this conclusion. To charge less than 50 thousand for that single performance was cash raping me and keeping my mind on other things such as where my next meal was coming from. .
I could not fathom this price structure as a young artist. It seemed outlandish to me at the time. Is what I do really worth that? Why am I always struggling with putting food on my table and in my belly? I really like good food and great wine pairings and yet I am existing on beer and pork skins.
I had to change my way of thinking about myself and the value I bring to the negotiating table. What I found out about myself amazed me to no end! I was worth something and the highly developed skills meant I no longer had to do the name dropping game, I could talk about myself and how I developed my skills by stepping outside the box and going for broke.
There is nothing wrong with challenging traditions and set ways of doing things and that is exactly how I have been living my life! I just had to see it to believe it.
When I took the lead and put out a set price, the inquiries and bookings started to happen again. I learned to be upfront and honest with myself and market what is special in my life. I changed some approaches also in that I was handpicked to study and work with some of the who’s who of American and International music. What a powerful attribute to bring to the table! That makes me a rare commodity in today’s world and I am marketing myself with that attitude and yet remaining humble is no longer a challenge. Being humble does not amount to humiliation and now I feel better about myself and the products I produce.

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